Resource - a commitment to our future  
 
Resource coffee and bottled water are helping to reduce global warming
> What’s a carbon footprint?
> How does Resource help?
> Resource coffee
> Resource bar schemes
> Who are Cool Earth?
> FAQs
> Rainforest facts
> Environment facts
> Contact us
> Home
> Resource update:
Click here to see how
much rainforest Cafe
Resource customers
have saved so far...
 
FAQs

Where are your projects and why have you chosen them specifically?
How big is an acre?
How much carbon do rainforests lock up?
Where are the rainforests?
 

Answer:

Where are your projects and why have you chosen them specifically?

Two of the launch projects are in Brazil and one in Ecuador. The reason for choosing these areas is threefold:

These areas are of paramount importance for their biodiversity but are threatened by human activities such as logging, cattle ranching and clearance for agriculture etc. These threats need to be countered if the carbon in these endangered habitats is to remain locked up.

Their location and/or conservation helps secure tens of thousands of acres of forest behind them ensuring our sponsors are protecting far more than their sponsored acres.

They are mature rainforests with uniquely high levels of biodiversity reflecting thousands of years of undisturbed growth, wildlife and species - they deserve to be left this way.

>Top
 

Answer:

How big is an acre?

An acre is just over 40,000 square feet.

Put another way, its a car park with 200 spaces, half a football pitch or 15 tennis courts.

Traditionally, an acre is the area an ox can plough in a day (or rather a morning since refuelling took up the afternoon).

An acre of rainforest

>Top
 

Answer:

How much carbon do rainforests lock up?

Each acre of rainforest locks in more than 100 tonnes of carbon. If an acre is burnt, this results in up to 260 tonnes of carbon dioxide or CO2 emissions.

Each year the destruction of rainforests releases more climate-warming CO2 than the entire USA.

>Top
 

Answer:

Where are the rainforests?

Rainforest covers 6% of the earth's land surface. They are concentrated in tropical regions, but extend as far north as Canada and as far south as Chile. It's the tropical rainforest - in the Amazon, in Central Africa and in South East Asia - that's most at risk. Each year, 50 million acres - an area the size of Britain - are cut down, emitting around 6 billion tonnes of CO2.

>Top
 
  Help protect rainforest species  
  Resource coffee and water  
  Resource bar schemes  
 
 
  > Home page | > Site map | > Terms & conditions Tel :+44 (0)1923 234561 > Email us